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Plan Ahead for Fall Mold Allergies

The following is from a guest post from Dr Bubak posted at The Prairie Doc

Summer and fall are prime seasons for mold allergy problems. Mold spores are smaller than pollen grains allowing them to not only effect the eyes and nose of allergy sufferers, but they can infiltrate the bronchial tubes and cause asthma. If the allergy or asthma is combined with participation in sports or a rhinovirus cold at the start of school, it could result in asthma attack. 
 
Sudden asphyxic asthma is a condition during peak mold time in which younger patients with alternaria mold allergy can go from breathing well on their own to severe asthma on a ventilator in an afternoon. There are methods to be prepared and take steps to avert this situation.
 
Most mold spores originate outdoors. Staying indoors and keeping the house, office, and car closed is the main avoidance method. The air conditioner with its filter and dehumidification can help a bit more. Additional filters receive some anecdotal praise but are rarely proven clinically helpful.

Mold is a major contributor to fall allergy and asthma suffering, but the worst reactions are typically brought on by a combination of triggers. Getting your flu shot can make the flares of allergic asthma far less likely to happen. Washing your hands helps prevent colds and other infections which can exacerbate the problem. And, using your albuterol before sports activity can help.
 
Read the full post here.

Topics: allergies, Asthma

Mark Bubak, M.D.

About the Author: Mark Bubak, M.D.

Dr. Bubak is certified by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology to care for adults and children with asthma and allergies. He has been active in allergy research and education with special emphasis on new allergy testing and treatment methods. A South Dakota native, his medical degree is from the University of South Dakota School of Medicine, with Allergy and Internal Medicine fellowships at the Mayo Clinic.